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TOPIC: Directional Lighting Using Old Reclaimed Security Camera Pods

Directional Lighting Using Old Reclaimed Security Camera Pods 5 months 4 weeks ago #17900

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Greets All!

As I work to take apart the last of my security camera pods for parts, I had an amazing idea! Something I need big time on my bench, working on my car, and even in the garage! I wish I had thought of this when I threw the other 15 pods away after parting them out.

I am going to install a high power LED emitter array on each one, and use the motors to direct the beam. I am removing all the old electronics and replacing them with new controllers I will design. All I have to do is experiment with the motors to figure out how to control them. Then when that is done, I will use my MQTT network to direct them, maybe with voice commands or my phone. So I will have adjustable spots with a very bright beam. SWEET!

More in a couple of days, with pics and ideas. I'm excited, and sick that I threw the other 15 away. I have 5 left.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Jon Chandler

Directional Lighting Using Old Reclaimed Security Camera Pods 5 months 2 weeks ago #17901

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Nice re-purposing! Seems that's the way it works....get rid of something then you think of how useful it could have been!

Totally off topic but since it's just the two of us here it seem....sometime back you mentioned having some I2C OLED displays with SSD1306 drivers. Did you ever put those to work? I brought a bunch of those and found a module on the Swordfish forum but in my 15 minutes of playing, it only makes half the module work.

Directional Lighting Using Old Reclaimed Security Camera Pods 5 months 2 weeks ago #17902

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I did not work with them yet. I have 5 of them though. I am going to hook them up after I get the ESP8266 talking to the STM32. The STM32F103C8T6 should be able to handle the OLED display just fine, and there are libraries for it using the arduino IDE. Different platform than you are use to, but I will definitely share my research and code once I tackle that. There are better SPI versions of the display out there now, 4 pin I believe and wish I had gotten those. I might still.

Most of the code in Arduino is basically just like C++. Some specifics that use the Arduino core, but I have read that it translates to the Eclipse platform rather nicely. I have not made that jump yet but plan to soon. I still feel like it is cheating using the Arduino IDE, with all the hand-holding, but it has allowed me to focus on the hardware and less on the software, for now. Plus I can currently use my various Arduino IDE's to program everything on my bench. Even the Teensy although I have effectively moved away from that board because of costs.

I can actually program my devices from a Beagle Bone Black or even a Raspberry Pi, but compiling is the bugger there, I found that I get the fastest results from a I5 or better level processor system.

The STM32F103C8T6 seems to be the way to go as far as costs for prototyping and end-user builds. For this line of work that is. Controlling motors, reading sensor data, and interfacing with internet-ready devices like the ESP8266. Poor-man's platform maybe, but I can do incredible things with the hardware.

Another note... it seems to be imperative that you have a linux home server running, at least for me. It's the core of all my work and handles talking to my devices perfectly. For me, it runs on an I5 dual core processor laptop running Debian Jessie configured as a LAMP server with no GUI.
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