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TOPIC: Samsung TV's and Bad Caps from the early 2000's

Samsung TV's and Bad Caps from the early 2000's 2 years 2 months ago #17935

  • hop
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Hi All!

I write this today because my beautiful 55" Samsung TV is dying. Why? I thought it was the seams on the LCD edges that were suffering from budget manufacturing. It turns out it is the power supply and it is failing because of bad capacitors used when it was built.

I did what most non-tech people do... I ordered a kit that was highly rated on Amazon.com. But yeah, I could have pulled the PSU and ordered the parts myself. I could have saved a few bucks, but the kit has the values I need and are high quality. Or so was posted in 219 feedback posts.

Thing is, Samsung would not lift a finger to service my out-of-warranty TV. I get it somewhat, but it was their fault on the quality control of their parts. In my opinion, they should have sent a repairman to right the issue for us for free. Their negligence and unwillingness to do that has me and my house determined to not buy another Samsung product ever again.

So thanks for reading, and here is my question...

After I replace the caps, how do I make sure the PSU is right moving forward? How do you repair guys go about looking at whatever you need to see at the end-user business end of a device's power supply?

I have the behemoth TV on its face in my lab ready for surgery. Is this something you learn in school for electrical engineering? If so, this is reason enough for me to finally get that bucket-list goal done.

Thank you for your time! :)

Samsung TV's and Bad Caps from the early 2000's 2 years 2 months ago #17936

  • Jon Chandler
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I'm happy your 55" Samsung died with bad caps. Well, not your particular TV! You see, friends of my partner had a 55" Samsung die; they bought a new TV and offered the "dead" one to my partner if he would haul it away.

I thought he was crazy, but this particular model was known for bad caps. We took the thing apart on the dining room table and removed the power supply. I took a look and sure enough, the two large electrolytics were bulging. RadioShack (rest in piece) had the right value of cap and the local store even had 2 of them.

They were simple to replace on the single-sided circuit board. For $4 of parts and 20 minutes of effort, WE had a beautiful 55" Samsung.


Bad caps aren't limited to Samsung. Many products from many manufacturers have suffered this problem. I recently fixed a TiVo for a friend that had bad caps in the power supply. I might have felt better about the repair had he not told me afterwards that he just wanted to watch a couple programs stored on it before junking it!

Generally, my approach is to replace bulging caps and see if it solves the problem. It's worked every time I've tried it
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Samsung TV's and Bad Caps from the early 2000's 2 years 2 months ago #17937

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Yes sir! I had a video card pop some bad caps from that event several years ago, where bad caps found their way into production boards of all kinds of appliances. I replaced the caps and was back on my way, for awhile. The caps stressed other components it seemed, and cascading failure was doomed to happen.

Hopefully that is not the case here. I have the TV open, spotted the power supply board, and sure enough, there are 4 bulging caps. I am on my way to replacing them.

Also on the PSU board there are two 450v large caps that I will check first if they are charged. On my quest on how to deal with a charged high voltage cap, I happened upon this amazingly funny video. Enjoy!

Samsung TV's and Bad Caps from the early 2000's 2 years 2 months ago #17938

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Should have looked at the values of the cap kit I bought. Should have known... the best way to do this is to diagnose the issue, then order the parts I needed. The kit I got did not have any 470uf caps I needed. And one of the bad caps is that value. Figures. Also, my flux pens were dry!!! DAMN IT!

So I need flux, an applicator, and caps.

Hey Jon, what do you like to use for flux and an applicator? I'm sure you have a preference. Can you help?

Samsung TV's and Bad Caps from the early 2000's 2 years 2 months ago #17939

  • Jon Chandler
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I've seen people swear by using extra flux but I never have for general circuit board stuff. I use a rosin core 60/40 solder...that I (used to) get at RadioShack (RIP).

I use some liquid flux when doing surface mount, either of I'm hand soldering or cleaning up bridges when using hot air. Again, it's a rosin flux.

I avoid non-rosin fluxes like "No clean" and "water-washable" for two reasons. The first is that the vapors from non-rosin fluxes are very irritating to me. The second is that many non-rosin fluxes are extremely corrosive if the board is not scrubbed after soldering.

Good luck with the repairs! Our "fixed" TV has been going strong for a couple years.
Last Edit: 2 years 2 months ago by Jon Chandler.
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Samsung TV's and Bad Caps from the early 2000's 2 years 2 months ago #17940

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I tried removing the solder with a solder wick but had a hard time getting the solder to flow. Was using a newer clean tip which is semi blunt with a chisel like end, a Hakko T18-D16 maybe, at sampled temp ranges from 600°-750°. I guess I could go back to my trusting desolder pump but it always leaves some solder left over. I never used a braid and thought I would give it a try. When I had issues, I went to the net and watched some youtube videos on it. It SEEMED that people that used flux in a heavier viscosity paste had much better luck cleaning up the board and the component removed. I have a hot air station too but did not think to use it here. It only goes up to 500°. All mentioned temps are in Fahrenheit.

I need to get this down to a science though. I have so many boards to cannibalize! I noticed that Hakko has a desoldering station that looks like it would make things a lot easier for me, although my ATTEN 858D has been a wonderful desoldering tool and works great for heat shrink tubing. I have David Jones to thank for that one.

It's fun stuff for sure!
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