From Embedded Lab - an I2C Tutorial

A number of devices have been decribed on the pages of Digital-DIY that use the I2C interface, including real time clocks, temperature sensors, WII Nunchuks, port expanders and even thermocouple interfaces and a number of Swordfish modules are available to make using these devices simple.  The TAP-20-USB board is based around using I2C for expansion.

Hack-A-Day posted about this tutorial available on Embedded Labs.  It's a nice overview on how to use I2C devices.  Have a look.

Lab 14: Inter-Integrated Circuit (I2C) communication

I2C (Inter-Integrated Circuit) is a short distance serial interface that requires only 2 bus lines for data transfer. It was invented by Philips in 1980′s, originally to provide easy on-board communications between a CPU and various peripheral chips in a TV set. Today, it is widely used in varieties of embedded systems to connect low speed peripherals (external EEPROMs, digital sensors, LCD drivers, etc) to the main controller. In this experiment, we will cover an overview of I2C protocol, its implementation in PIC microcontrollers, and the method of connecting single and multiple devices on a common I2C bus. We will demonstrate the technique by connecting two I2C EEPROM chips (24LC512) and an I2C compatible temperature sensor (DS1631) with PIC18F2550 microcontroller.

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Posted: 6 years 11 months ago by Jon Chandler #7828
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I was surprised to see this post on Hack-A-Day yesterday. Not that an I2C tutorial is surprising...the PIC18F2550 USB board from ME is closely along the lines of what I'm working on for the TAP-20-USB, albeit with a larger chip.

The StartUSB board from ME looks like a winner, especially considering it's just $19 assembled complete with bootloader code installed. An awesome way to break into PIC programming without the need to purchase a PICkit 2 or 3 of other programmer.

Posted: 6 years 11 months ago by Jon Chandler #7815
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In taking a closer look, I gave ME more credit than deserved for the StartUSB board. I thought the row of holes at the edge of the board was to support an LCD display. In actuality, the row of holes is just to bring all the port pins out to a header. The connections to the LCD shown in the article are made on a bread board.

Still a nice board for the price but not as similar to the TAP-20-USB as I had thought.

Posted: 6 years 11 months ago by W4GNS #7816
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And the shipping charge?

The StartUSB board from ME looks like a winner, especially considering it's just $19 assembled complete with bootloader code installed. An awesome way to break into PIC programming without the need to purchase a PICkit 2 or 3 of other programmer.
Posted: 6 years 11 months ago by Jon Chandler #7818
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And the shipping charge?

Since Gary can find the shipping cost just as easily as I can, I suspect he's making a point here. I admit, I had not checked when I made the post.

To the US, you have a choice of shipping methods. DHL-Express is $25. "Regular" is also $25. So the $19 board costs $44 by the time you get it.

So the board doesn't have an LCD connection and the shipping is outrageous. I retract my comments about being a good deal.

The article however is still valid.
Posted: 6 years 11 months ago by W4GNS #7817
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Like you, I had not checked the shipping, but from previous experiences, I knew it was $25 regardless of the method. They have some books that I would like to own (free for online viewing) for 24 bucks, but then they throw the $25 shipping in. About the only thing that "I" can justify buying with that shipping cost is there Dev boards, which I own 1 for Pics, and 1 for AVR. But for anyone interested inpaying that shipping, I must say it's fast from the eastern EU to east coast of US(about 4 days). Sorry to drag this OT, Jon

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